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Arcpy buffer polygon

By | 04.10.2020

Creates polygons that cover a given distance from a point, line, or polygon feature. Buffers are typically used to create areas that can be further analyzed using a tool such as Overlay Layers. For example, if the question is "What buildings are within 1 mile of the school? The end result is a layer of those buildings within 1 mile of the school. The size of the buffer can be entered as a constant using the distance option all buffers will be the same size or using values from a field different features can have buffers of a different size.

You can create a multiple-ring buffer using the distance option by entering multiple constants. By default, this tool will create overlapping buffers when the buffer areas meet.

When the input features are lines, the default is a rounded buffer on all sides of the lines. When the input features are polygons, the default is to include the input area in the buffer. When there are multiple input distances, the default is to create rings. If the input layer has a geographic coordinate system or uses a Web Mercator-based projected coordinate system, this tool uses a geodesic buffering algorithm to produce more accurate buffers.

The point, line, or polygon features to be buffered. The name of the output layer to create on your portal. A list of distance values to buffer the input features. You must supply values for either the distances or a distance field.

You can enter a single distance value or multiple values. The units of the distance values is supplied by the distance units. A field from the input layer containing one buffer distance per feature.

The units of the buffer distance. You must provide a value if cell size has been set. Determines how overlapping buffers are processed. Determines how multiple-distance buffers are processed. When buffering line features, you can choose which side of the line to buffer. Typically, you choose both sides Fullwhich is the default.

Left and right are determined as if you were walking from the first x,y coordinate of the line the start coordinate to the last x,y coordinate of the line the end coordinate.

Choosing left or right usually means you know that your line features were created and stored in a particular direction for example, upstream or downstream in a river network. When buffering polygon features, you can choose whether the buffer includes or excludes the polygon being buffered. If a side type is not supplied, the polygon being buffered is included in the result buffer. This is the default for polygon features. The shape of the buffer at the end-of-line input features.

This parameter is not valid for polygon input features. At the ends of lines, the buffer can be rounded round or be straight across flat. Feedback on this topic? Skip To Content. Back to Top. Summary Creates polygons that cover a given distance from a point, line, or polygon feature. Usage The size of the buffer can be entered as a constant using the distance option all buffers will be the same size or using values from a field different features can have buffers of a different size.

NONE — Overlapping areas are kept. This is the default. For example, if your distances are 10 and 14, the result will be two buffers, one from 0 to 10 and one from 0 to Creates buffer polygons around input features to a specified distance. Learn more about how Buffer works. If buffering a projected feature class that has features covering a large region, or you are using a very large buffer distance, distortions in the projection can cause inaccurate buffers to be produced.

You can completely avoid distortion when buffering by using a feature class that has a geographic coordinate system and specifying a Buffer Distance in linear units meters, feet, and so forth, as opposed to angular units such as degrees.

When this combination of inputs is used, the tool will generate true geodesic buffers that accurately represent distances on Earth's surface. Geodesic buffers may appear unusual on a flat map, but when displayed on a globe these buffers will look correct you can use the ArcGlobe or ArcGIS Explorer applications to view geographic data on a three-dimensional globe.

For more information, see How Buffer works. You can change the coordinate system of a feature class using the Project tool, or you can set the Output Coordinate System geoprocessing environment before executing the Buffer tool, and this coordinate system will be used in creating buffers. Improve the accuracy of buffers created with projected inputs by using a projection that minimizes distance distortion, such as an Equidistant Conic or an Azimuthal Equidistant projection, and is geographically appropriate for your input.

When buffering features in a projected coordinate system with output to a geodatabase feature class, the geometries created will often contain circular arc segments, especially when buffering points.

If these buffers that contain circular arcs are re-projected to a different coordinate system, the location and size of the original buffers will be transformed, but the shape of the buffers will not change, causing the re-projected buffers to no longer accurately represent the area covered by the original buffer. If you wish to re-project buffers containing circular arcs, first use the Densify tool to convert circular arc segments to straight lines, then re-project the buffers.

When buffering polygon features, negative buffer distances can be used to create buffers inside the polygon features. Using a negative buffer distance will reduce the polygons' boundaries by the distance specified. If the negative buffer distance is large enough to collapse the polygon to nothing, a null geometry will be generated.

A warning message will be given, and any null geometry features will not be written to the output feature class. If a field from the Input Features is used to obtain buffer distances, the field's values can be either a number 5 or a number with a valid linear unit 5 Kilometers.

If a field value is simply a number, it is assumed that the distance is in the linear unit of the Input Features' spatial reference unless the Input Features are in a geographic coordinate system, in which case, the value is assumed to be in meters. If the linear unit specified in the field values is invalid or not recognized, the linear unit of the input features' spatial reference will be used by default.

In ModelBuilder, where the preceding tool has not been run or its derived data does not exist, the Dissolve Field s parameter may not be populated with field names. The Add Field button allows expected fields to be added to the Dissolve Field s list in order to complete the Buffer tool dialog box.

The input point, line, or polygon features to be buffered. The distance around the input features that will be buffered. Distances can be provided as either a value representing a linear distance or as a field from the input features that contains the distance to buffer each feature.

If linear units are not specified or are entered as Unknown, the linear unit of the input features' spatial reference is used. When specifying a distance in scripting, if the desired linear unit has two words, like Decimal Degrees, combine the two words into one for example, '20 DecimalDegrees'.

The side s of the input features that will be buffered. This optional parameter is not available with a Basic or Standard license. The shape of the buffer at the end of line input features.Creates buffer polygons around input features to a specified distance using a parallel processing approach. The Pairwise Buffer tool is very similar to the Buffer tool. The Pairwise Buffer tool has the ability to process the buffer features in parallel.

This tool honors the Parallel Processing Factor environment. If the environment is not set the default or is set tofull parallel processing will be enabled and the tool will attempt to distribute the work to all the logical cores on the machine.

Setting the environment to 0 will disable parallel processing. If the result of this formula is 0 or 1 parallel processing will not be enabled. This tool relies on the input features having a spatial index. Use the Add Spatial Index tool to create a new index particularly for shapefiles or rebuild an existing index if there is any doubt about it being correct. As described in How Buffer worksan important feature of the Buffer tool is the Method parameter, which determines how buffers are constructed.

The two basic methods for constructing buffers, Euclidean and geodesic, are described as follows: Euclidean buffers measure distance in a two-dimensional Cartesian plane, where straight-line or Euclidean distances are calculated between two points on a flat surface the Cartesian plane.

Euclidean buffers are the more common type of buffer and are appropriate when you're analyzing distances around features in a projected coordinate system that are concentrated in a relatively small area such as one UTM zone. Geodesic buffers account for the actual shape of the earth an ellipsoidor more properly, a geoid.

Buffer (Analysis)

Distances are calculated between two points on a curved surface the geoid as opposed to two points on a flat surface the Cartesian plane. You should always consider creating geodesic in the following circumstances: Your input features are dispersed cover multiple UTM zones, large regions, or even the entire globe.

The spatial reference map projection of your input features distorts distances to preserve other properties such as area. Geodesic buffers may appear unusual on a flat map. When displayed on a globe, however, these buffers will look correct you can also use a 3D scene or ArcGIS Earth to view geographic data on a three-dimensional globe.

For more information, see How Buffer works. The Method parameter determines how buffers are created. This option will automatically determine which method to use based on the coordinate system of the input. If the input features have a projected coordinate system, Euclidean buffers will be created.

If the input features have a geographic coordinate system and you specify a Buffer Distance in linear units meters, feet, and so forth, as opposed to angular units such as degreesgeodesic buffers will be created.

The shape-preserving geodesic buffer densifies the input features prior to creating the output geodesic buffers to create buffers that more closely represent the input features' shape. If you are concerned about the shape of your buffers and how closely their shape matches the original input features, it is recommended that you investigate using this option, particularly when your input data is in a geographic coordinate system.

In some cases, this may take more time than the geodesic buffer created using the Planar option, but the result is a buffer that more accurately matches the shape of the input feature. You can change the coordinate system of a feature class using the Project tool, or you can set the Output Coordinate System geoprocessing environment before executing the Buffer tool, and this coordinate system will be used when creating buffers.

When using the Planar method, you can improve the accuracy of buffers created with projected inputs using a projection that minimizes distance distortion, such as an Equidistant Conic or an Azimuthal Equidistant projection, and is geographically appropriate for your input.

When buffering features in a projected coordinate system with output to a geodatabase feature class, the geometries created may contain circular arc segments when buffering points, the output will always be circular arcs.

If buffers containing circular arcs are reprojected to a different coordinate system, the location and size of the original buffers will be transformed, but the shape of the buffers will not change, causing the reprojected buffers to no longer accurately represent the area covered by the original buffer. If you reproject buffers containing circular arcs, first use the Densify tool to convert circular arc segments to straight lines, and then reproject the densified buffers.

When using the Geodesic method to create buffers, the buffer distance entered will be converted to meters in all cases. If a Dissolve Type of All or List is used, the output will not have this field. When buffering polygon features, negative buffer distances can be used to create buffers inside the polygon features.

Using a negative buffer distance will reduce the polygons' boundaries by the distance specified. If the negative buffer distance is large enough to collapse the polygon to nothing, a null geometry will be generated. A warning message will appear, and no null geometry features will be written to the output feature class.You can create a buffer around selected points, lines, or area features by using the Buffer command. Buffered features are created as line or polygon features using the settings of the chosen feature template.

For instance, you might use buffers to show an ecological zone around a waterway, distances from schools or public buildings that certain retail stores are located, or the area around a contaminated well. You can buffer more than one feature at once, but a separate buffer will be created around each feature.

The buffer distance is given in map units by default. You can also give the value in other units by specifying a distance units abbreviation with the value that you enter. Arc GIS for Desktop. Click the Edit tool on the Editor toolbar. Click the feature around which you want to create a buffer. Click the Editor menu and click Buffer. Type the distance in map units for the buffer area around the feature.

Choose the target in which the new feature will be created. If you have feature templates for the layers in your map, click the Template button and click the template to use to create the new feature. You can also double-click the preview of the template to choose a different template.

If you do not have feature templates, click the layer in which to create the feature. Click OK. Related Topics About distance units and editing Feedback on this topic?Creates buffer polygons around input features to a specified distance. Learn more about how Buffer works. As described in How Buffer worksan important feature of the Buffer tool is the Method parameter which determines how buffers are constructed.

There are two basic methods for constructing buffers: Euclidean and geodesic. Euclidean buffers measure distance in a two-dimensional Cartesian plane, where straight-line or Euclidean distances are calculated between two points on a flat surface the Cartesian plane. Euclidean buffers are the more common type of buffer and work well when analyzing distances around features in a projected coordinate systemwhich are concentrated in a relatively small area such as one UTM zone.

Geodesic buffers are those that account for the actual shape of the earth an ellipsoidor more properly, a geoid. Distances are calculated between two points on a curved surface the geoid as opposed to two points on a flat surface the Cartesian plane.

You should always consider creating geodesic buffers when Your input features are dispersed cover multiple UTM zones, large regions, or even the whole globe. The spatial reference map projection of your input features distorts distances in order to preserve other properties such as area. Geodesic buffers may appear unusual on a flat map, but when displayed on a globe, these buffers will look correct you can also use the ArcGlobe or ArcGIS Explorer applications to view geographic data on a three-dimensional globe.

For more information, see How Buffer works. The Method parameter determines how buffers are created. This option will automatically determine which method to use based on the coordinate system of the Input Features. If the input features have a projected coordinate system, Euclidean buffers will be created.

If the input features have a geographic coordinate system and you specify a Buffer Distance in linear units meters, feet, and so forth, as opposed to angular units such as degreesgeodesic buffers will be created. The shape-preserving geodesic buffer densifies the input features prior to creating the output geodesic buffers in order to create buffers that more closely represent the input features shape.

If you are concerned about the shape of your buffers and how closely their shape matches the original input features, it is recommended you investigate using this option, particularly when your input data is in a geographic coordinate system.

In some cases this may take more time than the geodesic buffer created using the Planar option, but the result is a buffer that more accurately matches the shape of the input feature. When using the Planar method, you can improve the accuracy of buffers created with projected inputs by using a projection that minimizes distance distortion, such as an Equidistant Conic or an Azimuthal Equidistant projection and is geographically appropriate for your input.

When buffering features in a projected coordinate system with output to a geodatabase feature class, the geometries created may contain circular arc segments when buffering points, the output will always be circular arcs.

arcpy buffer polygon

If buffers containing circular arcs are reprojected to a different coordinate system, the location and size of the original buffers will be transformed, but the shape of the buffers will not change, causing the reprojected buffers to no longer accurately represent the area covered by the original buffer. If you reproject buffers containing circular arcs, first use the Densify tool to convert circular arc segments to straight lines, and then reproject the densified buffers.

When using the Geodesic method for buffer creation, the buffer distance entered will be converted to Meters in all cases. If a Dissolve Type of All or List is used, the output will not have this field. When buffering polygon features, negative buffer distances can be used to create buffers inside the polygon features. Using a negative buffer distance will reduce the polygons' boundaries by the distance specified. If a field from the Input Features is used to obtain buffer distances, the field's values can be either a number 5 or a number with a valid linear unit 5 Kilometers.

If a field value is a number, it is assumed that the distance is in the linear unit of the Input Features' spatial reference unless the Input Features are in a geographic coordinate system, in which case, the value is assumed to be in meters.

If the linear unit specified in the field values is invalid or not recognized, the linear unit of the input features' spatial reference will be used by default.

Pairwise Buffer (Analysis)

In ModelBuilder, where the preceding tool has not been run or its derived data does not exist, the Dissolve Field s parameter may not be populated with field names.

The Add Field button allows expected fields to be added to the Dissolve Field s list in order to complete the Buffer tool dialog box. The input point, line, or polygon features to be buffered. The distance around the input features that will be buffered.A Polygon object is a closed shape defined by a connected sequence of x,y coordinate pairs. In many geoprocessing workflows, you may need to run a specific operation using coordinate and geometry information but don't necessarily want to go through the process of creating a new temporary feature class, populating the feature class with cursors, using the feature class, then deleting the temporary feature class.

Geometry objects can be used instead for both input and output to make geoprocessing simpler. Geometry objects can be created from scratch using GeometryMultipointPointGeometryPolygonor Polyline classes. The coordinates used to create the object. The datatype can be either Point or Array objects. The Z state: True for geometry if Z is enabled and False if it is not. The M state: True for geometry if M is enabled and False if it is not.

Buffer ArcGIS - ArcGIS Buffer Analysis - Arcmap Tutorial For Beginners

Returns a JSON representation of the geometry as a string. The returned string can be converted to a dictionary using Python's json. It provides a portable representation of a geometry value as a contiguous stream of bytes. It provides a portable representation of a geometry value as a text string. The area of a polygon feature. Empty for all other feature types. The true centroid if it is within or on the feature; otherwise, the label point is returned.

Returns a point object. A space-delimited string of the coordinate pairs of the convex hull rectangle. True, if the number of parts for this geometry is more than one. The point at which the label is located. The labelPoint is always located within or on a feature. The length of the linear feature.

Zero for point and multipoint feature types. The 3D length of the linear feature.

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The geometry type: polygon, polyline, point, multipoint, multipatch, dimension, or annotation. Constructs a polygon at a specified distance from the geometry. Constructs the intersection of the geometry and the specified extent. Indicates if the base geometry contains the comparison geometry. Only True relationships are shown in this illustration.

Constructs the geometry that is the minimal bounding polygon such that all outer angles are convex. Indicates if the two geometries intersect in a geometry of a lesser shape type. Two polylines cross if they share only points in common, at least one of which is not an endpoint.

A polyline and an polygon cross if they share a polyline or a point for vertical line in common on the interior of the polygon which is not equivalent to the entire polyline. Constructs the geometry that is composed only of the region unique to the base geometry but not part of the other geometry.

arcpy buffer polygon

The following illustration shows the results when the red polygon is the source geometry. Indicates if the base and comparison geometries share no points in common. Two geometries intersect if disjoint returns False. Returns the minimum distance between two geometries. If the geometries intersect, the minimum distance is 0.

Indicates if the base and comparison geometries are of the same shape type and define the same set of points in the plane.Creates buffer polygons around input features to a specified distance. Learn more about how Buffer works. As described in How Buffer worksan important feature of the Buffer tool is the Method parameter, which determines how buffers are constructed.

The two basic methods for constructing buffers, Euclidean and geodesic, are described as follows: Euclidean buffers measure distance in a two-dimensional Cartesian plane, where straight-line or Euclidean distances are calculated between two points on a flat surface the Cartesian plane.

Euclidean buffers are the more common type of buffer and are appropriate when you're analyzing distances around features in a projected coordinate system that are concentrated in a relatively small area such as one UTM zone. Geodesic buffers account for the actual shape of the earth an ellipsoidor more properly, a geoid. Distances are calculated between two points on a curved surface the geoid as opposed to two points on a flat surface the Cartesian plane.

You should always consider creating geodesic in the following circumstances: Your input features are dispersed cover multiple UTM zones, large regions, or even the entire globe. The spatial reference map projection of your input features distorts distances to preserve other properties such as area.

Geodesic buffers may appear unusual on a flat map. When displayed on a globe, however, these buffers will look correct you can also use a 3D scene or ArcGIS Earth to view geographic data on a three-dimensional globe. For more information, see How Buffer works. The Method parameter determines how buffers are created.

This option will automatically determine which method to use based on the coordinate system of the input. If the input features have a projected coordinate system, Euclidean buffers will be created.

If the input features have a geographic coordinate system and you specify a Buffer Distance in linear units meters, feet, and so forth, as opposed to angular units such as degreesgeodesic buffers will be created. The shape-preserving geodesic buffer densifies the input features prior to creating the output geodesic buffers to create buffers that more closely represent the input features' shape.

If you are concerned about the shape of your buffers and how closely their shape matches the original input features, it is recommended that you investigate using this option, particularly when your input data is in a geographic coordinate system. In some cases, this may take more time than the geodesic buffer created using the Planar option, but the result is a buffer that more accurately matches the shape of the input feature.

You can change the coordinate system of a feature class using the Project tool, or you can set the Output Coordinate System geoprocessing environment before executing the Buffer tool, and this coordinate system will be used when creating buffers.

arcpy buffer polygon

When using the Planar method, you can improve the accuracy of buffers created with projected inputs using a projection that minimizes distance distortion, such as an Equidistant Conic or an Azimuthal Equidistant projection, and is geographically appropriate for your input. When buffering features in a projected coordinate system with output to a geodatabase feature class, the geometries created may contain circular arc segments when buffering points, the output will always be circular arcs.

If buffers containing circular arcs are reprojected to a different coordinate system, the location and size of the original buffers will be transformed, but the shape of the buffers will not change, causing the reprojected buffers to no longer accurately represent the area covered by the original buffer. If you reproject buffers containing circular arcs, first use the Densify tool to convert circular arc segments to straight lines, and then reproject the densified buffers. When using the Geodesic method to create buffers, the buffer distance entered will be converted to meters in all cases.

If a Dissolve Type of All or List is used, the output will not have this field. When buffering polygon features, negative buffer distances can be used to create buffers inside the polygon features. Using a negative buffer distance will reduce the polygons' boundaries by the distance specified. If the negative buffer distance is large enough to collapse the polygon to nothing, a null geometry will be generated.

A warning message will appear, and no null geometry features will be written to the output feature class. If a field from the input is used to obtain buffer distances, the field's values can be either a number 5, for example or a number with a valid linear unit 5 Kilometers, for example.

If a field value is a number, it is assumed that the distance is in the linear unit of the input's spatial reference unless the input is in a geographic coordinate system, in which case, the value is assumed to be in meters. If the linear unit specified in the field values is invalid or not recognized, the linear unit of the input's spatial reference will be used by default.

In ModelBuilder, where the preceding tool has not been run or its derived data does not exist, the Dissolve Field s parameter may not be populated with field names. The Add Field button allows expected fields to be added to the Dissolve Field s list to complete the Buffer tool dialog box. The input point, line, or polygon features to be buffered.

The distance around the input features that will be buffered. Distances can be provided as either a value representing a linear distance or as a field from the input features that contains the distance to buffer each feature. If linear units are not specified or are entered as Unknown, the linear unit of the input features' spatial reference is used.

When specifying a distance, if the desired linear unit has two words, such as Decimal Degrees, combine the two words into one for example, 20 DecimalDegrees.


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